Cats can contract avian flu

Cats can contract avian flu

Cats can contract avian flu
Cats can contract avian flu

Cats can contract avian flu

Cats can contract avian flu . “It was February when a male cat who was two years old and eating lunch. It was a strange delicacy made from the carcass of a dead pigeon. After another five days had passed, the cat showed signs of having a discharge coming from his nose, as well as running a temperature, panting, and appearing dejected. This rapidly progressed to a state of convulsions and ataxia, and the patient passed away two days after the first signs were observed. The Center for Infectious Disease Research published this article on September 3, 2004, in its CIDRAP journal.

This tale is not intended to frighten you; rather, it is designed to educate you. According to the most recent news article, it seems that there have been no cases in the United States that are on par with those described in the article. However, the fact that it isn’t here… yet doesn’t imply that we should disregard the chance of it happening in the future. The World Health Organization stated, in response to the aforementioned instance being reported, that cats “had not previously been deemed naturally vulnerable to flu viruses.” This is the first study of its kind to report the whole H5N1 genome sequencing in a spontaneously infected household cat. Cats are considered to be companion animals and can coexist with people in extremely close proximity. It has not been documented that H5N1 may be passed directly from cats to people; nevertheless, this is not to say that it cannot happen.

It was discovered at the end of February 2006 that a variant of the H5N1 virus was present in a domestic cat that had been found dead on the German island of Rügen, which is located in the Baltic Sea. Studies using antibodies conducted in a number of Asian nations point to the possibility that dogs can potentially get the H5N1 virus. Pet owners who live in European countries that are close to H5N1 wild bird foci have been urged to keep their cats indoors and to keep their dogs on a leash whenever they take them for a stroll.

Now we are going to return to the ‘here and now’! We have no choice but to acknowledge the reality that there is a risk! It is going to be challenging for some of us cat owners more than it is going to be for others. For instance, both of my cats have had their claws removed, and we never let them out of the house, so I can be relatively certain that they are secure. However, those of you who let your cat have unrestricted access to the outdoors, where it may wander and play (and chase those birds), should probably exercise some more caution for the time being, at least until the danger has passed. When your “alpha cat” chose to bring home the bacon in the shape of a dead bird and place it in front of your favourite chair, it may have been charming in the past; however, those days are long gone. Now is the time for us to exercise some further prudence. The wisest course of action, in any situation involving suspicious behaviour or the possibility of sickness, is to visit the veterinarian. Much if it were just to address the present situation over the phone, this may help eliminate the potential of something even worse happening.

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