Horses with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Horses with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Horses with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Horses with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Horses with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Horses with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder . Although horses may give the impression that they can deal with anything that humans throw at them, the reality is that the horse is profoundly impacted by all of these changes, far more so than the majority of people are aware. To begin, horses are notoriously difficult animals when it comes to adapting to new environments. They are completely dependent on human beings for their own survival, and because of this, they want stability in their lives. As a result, they can not comprehend the necessity of the continuous occurrence of a large number of changes. It was by seeing a variety of horses and how they responded to each and every one of the aforementioned scenarios that I started to question if a horse might experience Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (PTSD).

What we discovered was fairly evident, and it has really served as the foundation for a number of different clinical investigations addressing horses and their potential to suffer from PTSD. The findings make it quite evident that horses can be impacted in a variety of ways that do, in fact, classify them as PTSD patients. Being lower in the area of cognitive skills makes it much harder for a horse to manage mentally in any situation where there is a much higher level of emotional decision-making, which is the main reason that came out of these various studies: horses do not have the same level of cognitive skills that people do. This is the main reason that came out of these various studies.

Horses are always aware of their environment and what is going on near them, which is another factor that makes them a more likely candidate for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Because of their innate capacity for continual awareness, they are able to interact with one another and, at the same time, they are able to monitor the feelings of the people who are in their immediate environment. This paves the way, just as it does for the war soldier or the abused kid, for the foundation of the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to be built upon. It might be an action that is taken against them that they believe is not necessary, or it could even be an incident that they watch happening to another horse. Both of these scenarios have the potential to cause the horse to become aggressive.

We primarily communicate through speech (and anticipate that the horse will completely understand us), whereas horses primarily communicate through body language and only resort to speech when it is absolutely necessary to do so. While we primarily use speech (and anticipate that the horse will completely understand us), horses primarily communicate through body language. Because of this, we have a tendency to ignore any signs of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that the horse may be exhibiting. The question now is, what are some of these signs? It could be something as straightforward and unobtrusive as cribbing, locking up (also known as freezing), swaying (also known as weaving), a rapid reaction to something that seems to us to be nothing, jaw displacement, or even the grinding of teeth. In addition, there is the possibility of more significant signs, such as persistent bucking, bolting, or even charging. Any one of these symptoms can be a clue that the horse is struggling with a significant issue that lies dormant deep inside its body.

Before we go any further, I want to make it clear that not all horses who exhibit many of the behaviours described above are horses that suffer from PTSD. Yes, all horses may be challenging at times and even overreact to certain circumstances. The one horse out of a group of horses that begins to act in a manner that is abnormal for them to act and continues to act in this manner on a consistent basis is the horse that is a candidate for PTSD.

Whenever the issue of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is brought up, whether in humans or horses, it is important to keep in mind that the condition originates in the mind; it might be a memory, a sound, something they smell, or even something that they have seen. All of these things are referred to as “triggers,” and while one or more of them may be all that is required to activate the PTSD problem, there is never any connection to a rational response after the process has been put in motion.

In the same way that clinical research programmes with people are proving that people can be helped, horses that suffer from PTSD can also be helped. In fact, the United States military is currently conducting a massive research programme on the East coast with returning warriors that concerns the use of “Low Level Light Therapy,” and it is showing extremely positive results. Already, this same non-invasive technology is being applied to horses in order to treat disorders that are comparable to but less severe than those seen in humans. The use of the results of “Low Level Light Therapy” in the field of equine care has advanced at a very quick rate, and it is currently being utilised in conjunction with other energy modalities to assist horses suffering from a variety of illnesses.

This is the work that is being done by “New Wave Therapy” in dealing with various horses, including horses suffering from PTSD, and they are having a lot of success with their client base. Their practise is centred on “Inviting Change Rather Than Forcing It,” and they have something that they call the “New Wave Therapy Method,” which is a gentle, body-based, non-invasive method for your horse.

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