Vaccines for kittens

Vaccines for kittens

Vaccines for kittens
Vaccines for kittens

Vaccines for kittens

Vaccines for kittens . In recent years, there has been a rise in the number of people vaccinating their cats. The feline infectious enteritis (FIE) vaccination, the feline influenza (often known as “cat flu”) vaccine, and the feline leukaemia vaccine are the three most prevalent vaccines available today (FeLV). An initial course of two shots, with the first one administered at nine weeks, is often administered, and after that, annual boosters are suggested.

The cat may vomit and have diarrhoea, and they will run a very high temperature. FIE will induce these symptoms. Before the vaccination was available, it was responsible for the death of a significant number of cats since the symptoms caused them to become dehydrated. The cat flu is caused by two different viruses: the feline rhinotracheitis virus and the calicivirus (FCV). The FVR is the more serious condition, and symptoms include coughing, sneezing, and discharge from the nose and eyes.

FVC is characterised by less severe discharges but a greater prevalence of gum irritation and mouth ulcers. Although neither FCV nor FVR is often fatal, the infection can sometimes persist in the form of snuffles, and some cats can become carriers of the disease without ever showing any symptoms. These cats show only modest signs of the virus when they are disturbed, yet they still spread it.

Because FeLV inhibits the action of the immune system of the cat, it makes it possible for a wide variety of symptoms to manifest. It is common for the cat to pass away after suffering from the sickness for a number of months. The virus is mostly transmitted through the saliva of cats. Cats who are involved in frequent fights and cats living in huge colonies where they share the same food and water bowls are more likely to contract this illness. If the food and grooming utensils are kept in good condition and the cats do not socialise with one another, then this should not be a cause for concern in a boarding cattery that is handled efficiently.

There is a vaccination available for protection against the chlamydial bacterium, which is responsible for not only relatively minor eye and nasal symptoms, but also, and more significantly, infertility and abortion. As a primary means of prevention against infertility in breeding colonies, this vaccination is administered.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button